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A little paint and board & batten

After a brief hiatus, I’m back – mostly have been working on paint, as well as some demo outside. One of my recent projects was a minor re-do of the bathroom, seen below in a ‘Before’ snap:

Before picture of bathroom

‘Before’

 

Now, more power to the previous owner for stepping outside the box and having the guts to go with Color! But it just wasn’t my style…

Each of those circles was hand-painted on, which left a paint rim around each circle that had to be sanded down before I could re-paint. In addition, the ceiling was painted blue (although no popcorn, yay!).

I also decided to try a board-and-batten treatment on the lower part of the walls. It seemed fairly simple (and it was – with my new saw). There are some good tutorials on Pinterest on how to do it, but basically, it’s just what it looks like: two horizontal boards with vertical strips between them. I did a ‘fake’ and the area between the boards is just the wall, painted to match, rather than a background board. The verticals are lattice (don’t ask for lattice in your home improvement store, they’ll send you to the garden!), the bottom are boards, and the top are the reverse side of chair rail trim. You’ll find all this stuff in the mouldings/chair rail section.

Here’s the board-and-batten:

Wall treatment

Board-and-batten

I chose a wall color pulled from the shower tiles, a dark bluish gray called ‘Dark Storm Clouds’. It seems dark for a small room, but worked out well, especially with the lighter bottom part. A few pops of color will finish things off!

More bathroom 'After' pics

More bathroom ‘After’ pics

That little shelf is an Ikea spice rack (Bekvem) painted to match the trim. I have several others I might install as well.

Issues: the floor tile was not even and the walls were not totally square. Things took some jerry-rigging. You’ll want to caulk all joints with paintable caulk, which will fill things in nicely. It’s worth the extra time it takes. You might want to tape the top rail before caulking although caulk can be wiped off when wet pretty easily. I also used a Caulk Finisher, a little rectangular device that slides along the rail and peels off extra caulk. Messy.

Anyway, I’m pleased with the results. I’ll probably do the board-and-batten in the hallway when I get to that part of the house, and I may do a better tutorial at that point. Now…on to the garden!